Asthma attack

How confident do you feel about helping someone who is having an asthma attack?

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I was playing netball with Jenny, Liz and Sally in PE. It was the first lesson of the day and it was really cold for the time of year.

We’re all pretty fit but some of the players from the school netball team were in the lesson so it was a tough game.

After a sprint from one end of the court to the other Jenny stopped and bent over onto her knees. I thought maybe she was just out of breath from all the running.

I kept playing for a minute but when I saw the other girls crowding around her I knew something must be going on.

Liz and Sally quickly realised how serious the situation was. Jenny was having an asthma attack and really struggling to breathe in and out normally.

They helped her to the side of the court. Our teacher found Jenny’s inhaler in her tracksuit pocket, and helped her to take it.

I wish I could have done something to help but other people seemed to know what to do. Jenny sat out for the rest of the game until her breathing got back to normal.

Liz sat with her to make sure she was alright. If something like that happened again I don’t think I would carry on playing. It made a real difference to Jenny that we stopped to help her.

Gina didn’t step in to help Jenny when she had an asthma attack, but some of her friends did. What would make you step in and help someone, rather than stand back?

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When someone is having an asthma attack, they will not be able to breathe normally. This type of breathing is often described as

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What is the key action to take if someone is having an asthma attack?

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How confident do you feel now about helping someone who is having an asthma attack?

Not at all Totally
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Asthma attackRemember: Help them take their medication